The preparations to welcome a baby start way ahead of its birth. With the whole family indulging in top baby brands to get the best daily use products for the newborn, the ignorance is often at its peak. From skin care products to diapers and baby wipes, established names in the baby-care industry leverage the blind faith of the market and people tend to buy their products without taking into consideration the listed ingredients. But, the harsh reality is that most of these products comprise a list of chemicals that serve to be extremely harmful to your baby.

One such product used daily for the supposed care of an infant is “baby wipes”. These might be doing more harm than good to your baby’s ultra-sensitive skin. With modernization in the lifestyle, wet wipes have replaced the traditional practice of using cotton and water for cleansing during a nappy change and are handier and easier to use. It saves time and is deemed to be more hygienic. However, if your little one still gets those red, itchy rashes on the bum even after all the care; the baby wipes are to be blamed. Believe it or not, most baby wipes contain ‘polyester’ – a water repelling material made of plastic. The use of polyester instead of organic or natural fabric cuts the manufacturing costs thereby increasing the profit margins of these well-established brands. However, it greatly impacts your baby’s skin and leads to allergies and rashes.

How to determine the presence of polyester in wet wipes?

 

Wondering how to protect your baby from the unintentional exposure to unpleasant chemicals? Here’s an easy DIY flame test you can conduct on the baby wipes to see if they are safe to use. All you require is a baby wipe, a candle, and a matchbox.

The Procedure for Flame Test-

-Light the candle using a matchstick.

-Dry up the baby wipe, hold it from a corner and burn it in the flame.

-Observe the results.

 

Variations in results-

If you sense a bad smell like that of plastic burning, it confirms the presence of ‘polyester’ in the fabric used for a wipe. You will also notice the formation of hard black residue or lumps on the burned edges which convey the inferior quality of the fabric and huge amount of polyester used in it. Such chemically formulated wipes are a definite no-no for your munchkin.

On the contrary, if you sense no bad smell or a smell similar to that of burned cloth or paper, it denotes that the wipes are made up of natural fabric and aren’t comprised of polyester. Moreover, there will be soft ash-like material instead of hard lumps. You can rely on such wipes to be safer for your baby.

“A brand that stood out the test”

Although the percentage of polyester varied with each brand, most of the popular baby wipes fail the flame test due to a cheap fabric. However, one brand that came out with flying colors is Mother Sparsh 98% water-based wipes.

When tested, these wipes burn into ashes without exhibiting any foul smell thereby confirming that no these are made up of natural and organic materials. The Mother Sparsh 98% water-based wipes are so gentle on your baby’s skin that they are often claimed to be “as good as cotton and water”.

 

Reasons to use Mother Sparsh baby wipes-

  • The use of 100% natural fabric such as cotton, make this brand highly recommended for a super soft baby skin.
  • It is the best among all the natural baby wipes available on the market as they are water-based sans any harmful chemical formulation, hence no side effects.
  • Unlike other brands, it has a superior quality of fabric that is extremely soft just like a mother’s touch.
  • Mother Sparsh wipes are 100% biodegradable, which makes them not only suitable for babies but also for the environment.

As your baby’s skin is a lot more sensitive than yours, it is essential that all the products are selected carefully. After all, your baby’s health and well-being matter the most, right?

To see how to perform the flame test and identify whether your baby wipe is made of natural/organic materials or not –

Video 1 – Click here

Video 2 – Click here

Video 3 – Click here

Know More about the Brand-  mothersparsh

 

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